Morrissey Misunderstood Again— Now by One of his Disciples

I bury the living

When I was a young lad and heard The Smiths for the first time, I felt a sudden solace in my soul. The words, written almost exclusively by Stephen Patrick Morrissey, were genius to me as they spoke to my situation at the time. When The Smiths broke up, I was glad that Morrissey decided to stick to why his fans wanted. Through the decades, he has always been, and still remains, a voice for the voiceless.

Can we see what is really being said here?

Compare the top with the original interview. Obviously, their interpretation is fake news.

This is the original interview.

I don’t write these things lightly. In fact, Morrissey is very much like the disturbed yet upfront psychotherapist who reassures you he is there even in the biggest times of turmoil. And there are songs for every occasion. Listen to how Mancunians are feeling from a concert clip at the Hollywood Bowl and anti-war songs about ignorance from Dusseldorf.

Coincidentally, or perhaps just as a matter of logical progression, my politics and mores have been akin to Morrissey’s. I would get a political or societal thought, and Morrissey would echo it in his latest song, album, or medium scrum.

Like so many others these days, people interpret Morrissey’s words, in song or on media, at face value. The politically correct world we live in knitpicks every word he utters because, as we have always known, he is anti-establishment. A man shall not be muted if he truly believes something and echoes it. This is not hate speech. These are thoughts from a person’s mind misconstrued my media hounds ready to ruin his record sales and his whole reputation. Fake news is winning because people’s attention spans are too short and they don’t bother finding alternative voices and thinking for themselves.

I wish you lonely

Morrissey stands for truth. He is not racist, misogynistic, nor nationalistic. He supports certain causes that are benign as to the harm they can do. And you need not agree with everything he says. What bewildered me is that most of his views are shared by the public. Brexit was voted on. These were not nazis who voted for change.

Morrissey has made it clear that he is not right wing nor any other kind of wing simply because left wing and right wing no longer exist. And this is undeniable. Neoliberalism and its politically correct hypocrisy have convoluted our minds and are successful in brainwashing the masses.

The Smiths were voted as the most influential British band of all time. They were ahead of the Beatles, who were at number two. And Morrissey was, at least lyricwise, the backbone of the band. So here we are, demonizing someone who has said not done anything wrong.

Shame on us.

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Morrissey: Low in High School 

Morrissey has come out with a landmark album. Just 13 years after his previous landmark,  self-defining “You Are the Quarry”, Morrissey fittingly,  and thankfully for his mob of new and old fans, comes out with an album that redefines the malaise in this world while also pointing out love and survivalmin a new way. 

Morrissey proves through his lyrics that he holds no -ism, just an unfunneled and unfiltered pointbof view which has caught up with the times. He’s against war (listen to the hauntingly first person death spell of “I Bury the Living”), police brutality (“Who Will Protect Us from the Police”), and the media (My Love,  I’d Do Anything for You” and “Spent the Day in Bed”). Yet he is for Brexit, in the mockingly sardonic “Jacky’s Only Happy When She’s Up on the Stage”, where everyone just seems to need to exit to getntheir freedom back. Wht proves to be the point lyrically is the movement against the stereotypes brought about by neoliberalism. Morrissey doesn’t care what his critics think.  And this emboldens the album and makes it into a storybook against politically correct angst. 

Morrissey has evolved immensely musicallyas well. His band has tightened up their sound while broadening tehir musical horizons. One of the best songs on the album is the controversially titled “The Girl From Tel  Aviv Who Wouldn’t Kneel”. Morrissey takes on the role of jazz lounge singer and does it impeccably. You expect to see him taking over Bill Murray’s role in “Lost in Translation”, but without the trite hoopla. Every song stands by itself yet is an important piece in making the album mesh. The ever-popular “Spent the Day in Bed” and “I Wish You Lonely” are cute pop tunes and stand alone, yet they are there ro inrtroduce us to media corruption and loss of individualism. They re mild intros to more serious songs. Andmit seems that the more serious song is, the more heavy or dramatic the music gets. The band goes from heavy rock to ballad,to pop, to jazz, to something akin to country, etc… in a natural fashion. 

Easily the best album of the year, Morrissey proves that he stiill has it in his late-50s. This is Morrissey’s best music since “You Are the Quarry” and the 3rd-best album he’s made.

POSTSCRIPT: Not sure what Lili Simmons has to do with the album, but I include her here as part of the memory of those classic The Smiths album covers. The true fans of old get my drift.